ACTIONS

ORGANIZE LOCALLY

Change starts with one idea and the courage to pursue it. If you are heading to Washington, DC this weekend to participate in the Puerto Rican Diaspora Summit (Saturday) and the Unity March for Puerto Rico (Sunday) or organizing an event in your community, download and print these posters (18”x24”) at your local office supply store or share these images on social media. Together let’s take action for Puerto Rico.

Tag us @100DAYSXPUR

Use this artwork to encourage others to speak up and take action for Puerto Rico.

WE CARE.

WE VOTE.

WE HAVE THE POWER TO MAKE CHANGE HAPPEN.

REQUEST THAT CONGRESS EXPAND THE CHILD TAX CREDIT & EXTEND THE EARNED INCOME TAX CREDIT TO RESIDENTS OF PUERTO RICO

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators and Representative. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message.

Or find your Member of Congress here

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR /REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] support expanding the Child Tax Credit (CTC) and extending the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for the residents of Puerto Rico. These two pro-work, anti-poverty programs would increase the economic well-being of thousands of low-income Puerto Ricans and reduce migration to the mainland.

Will [YOUR SENATOR/REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME ] publicly support Puerto Rico’s long term economic recovery, working parents and job creation on the island?

BACKGROUND:

Most Puerto Ricans do not currently qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit, perhaps the most successful anti-poverty, pro-work program in the history of the United States. Congress should authorize the extension of this program to residents of Puerto Rico, which would lift thousands of working families from poverty.

Also, the Child Tax Credit (CTC) currently applies only to Puerto Rican families with three or more children. Extending the CTC, including its refundable option, to families with 1 or 2 children would provide a much needed boost to approximately 355,000 working families and 440,000 children.

Many Puerto Rican families with children decide to leave the island because of the lack of economic opportunities and ability to provide for their children. This situation has worsened after Hurricane Maria. Statistics compiled by the Youth Development Institute of Puerto Rico illustrate the dire context that children and their families face. In 2016, more than half of children (56%) were living in poverty, with nearly 4 out of 10 living in extreme poverty. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of children lived in families were a parent worked at least 50 weeks a year, yet they still lived in poverty or near poverty.

Together, these two programs would increase the economic well-being of thousands of low-income Puerto Ricans and mitigate post Maria migration to the mainland.

Puerto Ricans pay their fair share of tax dollars in the form of Federal payroll taxes, business taxes, and estate taxes just not on salaries or income derived on the island. There are precedents within the CTC itself to extend tax credits to Puerto Rico for the purposes of economic development.

Source: Advocacy for the Resilient Rebuild of Puerto Rico, Center for a New Economy.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Bipartisan Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico Releases Final Report

Instituto Desarrollo Juventud

DEMAND THAT FEDERAL FUNDING BE USED TO BUILD A MORE SUSTAINABLE, COST-EFFECTIVE & SUSTAINABLE GRID FOR PUERTO RICO

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators and Representative. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message.

Or find your Member of Congress Here

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].
I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR /REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] direct FEMA and other federal agencies to rebuild a better electrical grid for Puerto Rico in the upcoming hurricane relief bill. Federal agencies must not waste taxpayer money rebuilding the unreliable, inefficient, and expensive electricity grid that existed prior to the hurricanes. Puerto Rico needs a resilient, cost-effective, and sustainable grid.

Will [YOUR SENATOR/REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME ] publicly direct federal agencies to #RebuildBetter?”

BACKGROUND:

Hurricanes Irma and Maria took a catastrophic toll on Puerto Rico’s electricity system. Two thirds of the island remains without power, affecting critical facilities such as hospitals and basic municipal, business, and residential functions. As a result, thousands of businesses have closed and residents have begun fleeing the island.

Funded in large part by FEMA, workers from Puerto Rico and across the United States are working to rebuild the grid. However, under the constraints of the Stafford Act, these crews are directed to rebuild the grid ‘as was’. This process will return the island to an electricity system that uses antiquated generation located far from the population centers, fragile transmission and distribution lines, and limited technological upgrades – leaving Puerto Ricans paying more, getting less, and still exposed to hurricanes and other natural disasters.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

The Stafford Act and Emergency Management-related Provisions of the Homeland Security Act

The Bad Decision That Will Haunt Puerto Rico For Decades

DEMAND THAT PUERTO RICO IS INCLUDED IN THE NEXT DISASTER SUPPLEMENTAL BILL

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators and Representative. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message.

Or find your Member of Congress Here

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR /REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] make sure that Puerto Rico is included in the upcoming disaster supplemental bill. There is work currently underway to assess damages before the end of the year that would make it clear that Puerto Rico, and the 3.4 million US citizens that live there, will need broad support to rebuild its infrastructure, stimulate its economy and attend to basic human needs. This help is needed now, not later. Puerto Rico CANNOT be left out of the upcoming relief bill.

Will [YOUR SENATOR/REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME ] publicly support the inclusion of Puerto Rico in the upcoming disaster supplemental bill?

BACKGROUND:

After the last disaster relief supplemental* bill, which only included a $4.9 billion LOAN to Puerto Rico, the White House promised that Congress would receive a request this month for a new round of disaster aid for communities affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria and western wildfires. However, Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney recently indicated that additional disaster-relief requests will only follow after assessments are completed. Texas and Florida, which were affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma, have already completed their damage assessments and are keen to get additional funding as soon as possible. Although Puerto Rico is still awaiting preliminary damage assessments, insured and uninsured losses already escalate to $95 billion (Moody’s).

Rumors on Capitol Hill are that Congress may soon introduce a follow-on disaster relief supplemental* bill that only includes Texas and Florida. This would be tragic for Puerto Rico, whose people are in desperate need right now.

The upcoming disaster supplemental* bill may be Puerto Rico’s last chance to get the funding it needs to rebuild its infrastructure, stimulate the economy, and attend to the basic needs of the 3.4 million US citizens who live there.

*Supplemental bills are voted on outside the regular budget procedures when extraordinary situations arise that call for additional funding for federal government services. The impacts of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and María qualify as extraordinary.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Disaster relief bill clears major hurdle in Senate
Senate Passes Hurricane Relief Bill Granting Puerto Rico Loans
Hurricane Maria could be a $95 billion storm for Puerto Rico
The Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico

WHAT TO ASK BEFORE YOU DONATE TO ORGANIZATIONS POST-HURRICANE MARÍA

It’s been 44 days since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico and there are still many people in need of basic supplies, medicine and housing. Nonprofits are stepping to the plate, but how can you make sure that the your donations to these organizations translate into action on the ground? Below are 10 things you should consider before making a donation. Thank you Imanol E. Caballero for allowing us to share this translation of his article.

Things To Consider Before You Donate to Organizations Post-Hurricane María. Author: Imanol E. Caballero

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, thousands of people have asked each other how best to help, where to send relief supplies, what supplies to send, who to donate to and who to trust. Dozens of new initiatives, with good intentions, have been created to meet the needs on the island. Artists and politicians have called for donations to various organizations they are backing. But, what are the must-haves for entities to ensure a donor’s intentions translate to action on the ground? It is important, beyond the good-faith efforts of the entity that promotes the drive or fundraiser, that the organization has community-based contacts and that it abides by basic principles of transparency and accountability recognized by expert organizations. It is not enough to “promise” that money or donations will arrive and will be used properly.

It is common to raise large amounts of money after a humanitarian crisis. As an example, according to the United Nations, between 2010-2012, approximately $ 6.04 billion was raised in humanitarian aid for the recovery of Haiti, but the results in the end were questionable. Since then, there has been an arduous debate about how to improve the performance of corporate, governmental and non-governmental initiatives borne from natural disasters and humanitarian crises.

What follows are basic principles to consider before you donate or participate in relief and recovery initiatives. Some are relevant for government and non-governmental entities to ensure transparency and avoid mismanagement of funds. They are adapted from the following reports: 1- Preventing Corruption in Humanitarian Assistance sponsored by Feinstein Humanitarian Center of Tufts University, Humanitarian Policy Group and Transparency International and 2- Handbook in Preventing Corruption in Humanitarian Operations of Transparency International.

1. Purpose of the Collection/Fundraiser
The organization must communicate how the money or goods will be specifically used beyond general terms such as “For the Recovery of Puerto Rico.” For example: Distribute food to the elderly; impact low-income mothers in a specific region of the island; buy materials for rescuer workers in flooded areas.

2. Long and Short-Term Plan
It is not unusual for entities to lose focus on a project when it is thought there has been impact on the beneficiaries. To address this entities must communicate goal and performance measures up front.

3. Identifying need by region / community
The entity must communicate how it identified the need. A common mistake is to think that different areas or regions have the same need when in fact the needs of different communities, populations, and regions can vary immensely.

4. Publication of revenues and expenditure reports
The organization must routinely publish income and expenditures of the initiative to satisfy public scrutiny. To this end, they must audit using an independent entity. The report should explain the criteria used in the analysis.

5. Collections/drives must routinely publish the following:
a. Inventories of products received and distributed
b. Destination of donations
c. Day and time supplies were sent and received
d. Individuals / community leaders or government agencies that received supplies

6. Community validation
The organization must have community support. Communities have their ear to the ground and can validate if in fact the actions taken by the entity correlate with the goals communicated to donors.
a. The organization should promote open discussion between beneficiaries and donors through social events, chats, teleconference calls, and other.
b. The entity must publish minutes on the decision-making regarding the aid and who is involved in the decisions.

7. Openness to press scrutiny.
The entity must routinely communicate its efforts to the press.

8. Performance Reporting.
Commitment to publish independent reports with findings and recommendations on practices to improve humanitarian aid work or response to natural disasters.
a. The recommendations should incorporate feedback from beneficiaries and donors collected through interviews and research.
b. If a private entity is hired, they must have contracting protocols in place to avoid mismanagement of funds and conflicts of interest. To this end, it is important to have an anti-corruption policy in place for humanitarian aid initiatives. It is not enough to state a ‘zero corruption tolerance’ policy but remain silent when it occurs or not have mechanisms to address it.

9. Have a contact available to answer frequently asked questions.
Have whistleblower protocols in place to receive and respond to complaints of misuse of supplies or mismanagement of money should they occur.

10. Have multisectoral collaboration policies.
Organizations must have collaboration protocols in place to coordinate their efforts with other organizations or the government. Neither government nor NGOs can deal with a humanitarian crisis or disaster response projects on their own. It is a good sign when organizations are endorsed by other organizations or have independent sponsors. The practice of endorsements and technical support networks between organizations should be encouraged.

BELOW ARE FIVE ORGANIZATIONS WITH DIVERSE MISSIONS WHERE YOU CAN PUT THESE RECOMMENDATIONS TO PRACTICE

CALL THE EPA – DEMAND SAFE DRINKING WATER IN PUERTO RICO

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demand the deployment of enough resources and personnel to ensure that the people of Puerto Rico have access to safe drinkable water.

  1. CALL Region 2 at (877) 251-4575, ask to be transferred to Administrator Pete López’s office.
  2. Email Region 2 Administrator Pete López (lopez.peter@epa.gov) with CC to Deputy Region 2 Administrator Catherine McCabe (mccabe.catherine@epa.gov)

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME] and I am a concerned citizen calling to urgently ask the EPA to deploy more resources and personnel to Puerto Rico to test potable water sources, address Superfund sites, and ensure the safety of the people of Puerto Rico. A public health and environmental crisis looms as desperate people are drawing water from Superfund sites and raw sewage and other pollutants are contaminating water reservoirs. Will the EPA deploy more resources to ensure the safety of 3.4 million U.S. citizens?

Thank you for your time.”

EMAIL SCRIPT:

[Click here to generate the email]

“Dear Administrator Lopez,

My name is [NAME] and I am a concerned citizen writing to urgently ask the EPA to deploy more resources and personnel to Puerto Rico to test potable water sources, address Superfund sites, and ensure the safety of the people of Puerto Rico. A public health and environmental crisis looms as desperate people are drawing water from Superfund sites and raw sewage and other pollutants are contaminating water reservoirs.

Will the EPA deploy more resources to ensure the safety of 3.4 million U.S. citizens?

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

[CONCERNED CITIZEN’S NAME]”

BACKGROUND:

The Washington Post, CNN, and other media outlets have reported that citizens in the municipality of Dorado in northern Puerto Rico were drinking water from the Dorado Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. Superfund sites are locations contaminated by hazardous waste and designated by the EPA as candidates for cleanup because they pose a risk to human health and/or the environment. Puerto Rico has 18 Superfund sites throughout the main island and in Vieques. The severe shortage of safe and potable drinking water caused by Hurricane Maria is leading desperate citizens in Puerto Rico to turn to contaminated water sources. To make matters worse, due to the damage to services and infrastructure caused by the storm, raw sewage and other pollutants are contaminating water reservoirs, endangering long-term access to clean water for all Puerto Ricans.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Desperate Puerto Ricans line up for water — at a hazardous-waste site
Search for Superfund Sites Where You Live
Summary of the Clean Water Act 
Raw sewage contaminating waters in Puerto Rico after Maria
EPA Hurricane Maria Update for Sunday, October 15th

CALL THE SENATE – $36.5 BILLION IS IRRESPONSIBLE & NOT ENOUGH

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently ask [YOUR SENATOR’S NAME] support increasing the funding on the proposed $36.5 billion emergency supplemental package. Preliminary estimates by Moody’s Analytics indicate that the damages in Puerto Rico alone are approximately $95 billion. Proposing $36.5 billion for hurricane victims in Texas, Florida, California, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico is irresponsible and unacceptable.

In recent days, almost a dozen senators from both sides of the aisle have committed to advocate for additional funds. Will [YOUR SENATOR’S NAME] support increasing the funding on the emergency supplemental package?

Thank you for your time.”

BACKGROUND:

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a $36.5 billion emergency supplemental package. The request is broken down into: $18.67 billion to continue funding FEMA’s operations of which up to $4.9 billion may be transferred to the Community Disaster Loan Program for direct loans to assist local governments with liquidity, $16 billion for the National Flood Insurance Program, $1.27 billion for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and $576.5 million for the Forest Service. These funds would be distributed amongst Texas, Florida, California, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. The bill is now being evaluated by the U.S. Senate.

According to the Fiscal Oversight Board for Puerto Rico, a preliminary report from Moody’s Analytics suggested that the damages caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico could be approximately $95 billion. Twenty-six days after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, almost a dozen Senators – from both sides of the aisle – have seen in person the devastation caused in Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria. Amongst them, Senators Richard Blumenthal, Kirsten Gillibrand, Ron Johnson, Tim Kaine, Cory Gardner, Bill Nelson, and Marco Rubio. Many of them have committed to advocate for additional emergency supplemental funds for Puerto Rico. The U.S. Senate is expected to vote early this week on this bill.

TELL CONGRESS – $30 BILLION IS IRRESPONSIBLE & NOT ENOUGH

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Congressional Appropriations Committee at 202-225-2771. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently ask that the Chairman of the Committee increase the funding on the proposed $29 billion disaster aid package. Moody’s Analytics preliminary estimates indicate that – in Puerto Rico alone – the damages caused by Hurricane Maria are approximately $95 billion. Proposing $29 billion for hurricane victims in Texas, Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico is irresponsible and not enough.

Will the Chairman increase the funding on the disaster aid package?

Thank you for your time.”

BACKGROUND:

Last week, the White House sent to Congress a $29 billion disaster aid package request. The request is broken down into: $13 billion to continue funding FEMA’s operations and $16 billion for the flood insurance program, which benefits hurricane victims in Texas, Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. The disaster aid package request is being assessed in Congress by the House of Representatives Appropriations Committee. However, according to The Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico, a preliminary report from Moody’s Analytics suggested that the damages caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico could be approximately $95 billion. For this reason, the $29 billion proposed in the disaster aid package request is not enough.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

The White House Is Planning a $29 Billion Disaster Aid Package
Congressional Appropriations Committee
Chairman of the Committee
The Financial Oversight and Management Board for Puerto Rico

REQUEST A CONGRESSIONAL EMERGENCY HEARING ON PUERTO RICO AND U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS RECOVERY EFFORTS

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform at 202-225-5074. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently ask that Chairman Trey Gowdy hold an emergency hearing about the dire status of recovery efforts in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Immediate action by the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform could help expedite the federal response to the devastation in these territories and make a significant difference in the lives of the 3.5 American citizens living there.

Will the Chairman authorize this request?

Thank you for your time.”

BACKGROUND:

On Friday, September 29th, Rep. Elijah Cummings (Ranking Member of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform) and Rep. Stacey Plaskett from the U.S. Virgin Islands, sent a letter to Chairman Trey Gowdy communicating their grave concerns with the recovery efforts in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. In addition, they requested that the Committee hold an emergency hearing this week with government officials from the White House, the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

In their letter, the Members cited the precedent of the former Republican Chairman, Tom Davis, who led a congressional investigation into the Bush Administration’s response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The members wrote, “Oversight now also could help prevent a worsening of the human tragedy that is unfolding and could help ensure that the lessons our Committee identified from past federal responses are implemented by the Trump Administration.”

ASK YOUR SENATORS & REPRESENTATIVES TO REPEAL THE JONES ACT

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators/Congress. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR /REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] please joins Senator John McCain and Senator Mike Lee, in supporting a repeal of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico.  The 10-day waiver approved today by the Department of Homeland Security is NOT enough to help the Puerto Rico recover from the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria and to aid the U.S. territory’s long term recovery.  It is unacceptable to continue to force the people of Puerto Rico to pay twice as much for food, clean water, and supplies due to Jones Act requirements.

Will [YOUR SENATOR/REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] publicly support a repeal of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico?

BACKGROUND:

The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, requires that any product shipped by water between two U.S. ports must use a ship built in the U.S., owned by Americans, crewed by Americans and flying the American flag. This makes shipping food, clean drinking water, supplies, and infrastructure from the U.S. mainland to Puerto Rico twice as expensive than it is to ship from other ports in the world.  Today, the Department of Homeland Security approved a 10-day waiver of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico, but this is not enough to help emergency efforts and aid long-term recovery.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

THE OBSCURE LAW THAT SLOWED AID TO PUERTO RICO

THE LAW STRANGLING PUERTO RICO 

GAO REPORT 2013

REQUEST TO REPEAL THE JONES ACT

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators/Congress. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE #].

I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR /REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] please joins Senator John McCain, in supporting a repeal of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico.

The 10-day waiver approved today by DHS is NOT enough to help the Puerto Rico recover from the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria and to aid the U.S. territory’s emergency and long term recovery. It is unacceptable to continue to force the people of Puerto Rico to pay twice as much for food, clean water, and supplies due to Jones Act requirements.

Will [YOUR SENATOR/REPRESENTATIVE’S NAME] publicly support a repeal of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico?

BACKGROUND:

The Merchant Marine Act of 1920, also known as the Jones Act, requires that any product shipped by water between two U.S. ports must use a ship built in the U.S., owned by Americans, crewed by Americans and flying the American flag. This makes shipping food, clean drinking water, supplies, and infrastructure from the U.S. mainland to Puerto Rico twice as expensive than it is to ship from other ports in the world. Today, the Department of Homeland Security approved a 10-day waiver of the Jones Act for Puerto Rico, but this is not enough to help emergency efforts and aid long-term recovery.

REQUEST FOR IMMEDIATE ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE

HOW TO TAKE ACTION:

Call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and follow the prompts to reach your Senators/Congress. Fill out the blanks and read the script when the staff answers the phone or leave a voice message. Repeat tomorrow.

SCRIPT:

“Hi, my name is [NAME], I am a voting constituent living in [CITY/TOWN] and my zip code is [ZIP CODE]. I’m calling to urgently request that [YOUR SENATOR/CONGRESS MEMBER’S NAME] please call FEMA to demand an immediate deployment of additional rescue and relief resources to Puerto Rico after the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria.

BACKGROUND:

The situation in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria is critical. The destruction is comparable to the devastation caused by Katrina. We need to activate all voting U.S. citizens to demand that the federal government, through FEMA, significantly increase its response on the ground – immediately. You are a voting citizen and your voice matters for Puerto Rico right now. Call your Senators and Representative in Congress to help the 3.5 million American citizens in Puerto Rico receive the rescue and relief they need. Here is how:

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